32nd Kyoto Prize: The Inamori Foundation recognises prominent figures from the fields of robotics, medicine and philosophy

den 10 november 2016

Roboticist Dr Takeo Kanade, medical scientist Dr Tasuku Honjo and philosopher Dr Martha Craven Nussbaum received the Kyoto Prize for their life’s work in the former imperial city today. The prize, alongside the Nobel, is among the world’s most prestigious awards, honouring the life’s work of researchers and thinkers who have made significant contributions to science and culture.

This year’s prize winners received the Kyoto Prize at an awards ceremony today. The Inamori Foundation is awarding the prestigious annual prize for the 32nd time this year on 10 November, recognising and honouring the life’s work of researchers and thinkers who have made significant contributions to science and culture. Three laureates from the fields of Arts and Philosophy, Advanced Technology and Basic Sciences received the award at the Kyoto International Conference Center in the former imperial city. Princess Takamado, a member of the Japanese imperial family, was also in attendance as well as over a thousand guests who were invited from the fields of science, culture and politics all over the world. The award includes a diploma, the Kyoto Prize medal and prize money of 50 million yen (approx. €430,000).

The three laureates of the Kyoto Prize 2016

The Kyoto Prize: An award steeped in tradition

The Kyoto Prize was established in 1984 by Kazuo Inamori, founder of Kyocera, a Japanese technology Group headquartered in Kyoto, Japan.

The Inamori Foundation, also founded by Kazuo Inamori, awards the prize every year in November in three categories: Advanced Technology, Basic Sciences and Arts and Philosophy.

Prize winners in the last 32 years include prominent figures such as the late choreographer Pina Bausch, philosopher Jürgen Habermas, Japanese fashion designer Issey Miyake, French composer Pierre Boulez as well as molecular biologist Yoshinori Ohsumi, who received the Nobel Prize for his research this year.

You can find more information on the Kyoto Prize and the Inamori Foundation at http://www.kyotoprize.org/en/.

For more information on Kyocera: http://global.kyocera.com

 

 

 

The Kyoto Prize

 

The Inamori Foundation is awarding the 32nd Kyoto Prize this year, honouring those who have made a significant contribution to art and science. Previous winners of the prize include the French composer Pierre Boulez, German choreographer Pina Bausch, philosopher Jürgen Habermas, Japanese fashion designer Issey Miyake, musician and conductor Nikolaus Harnoncourt, artists Maurice Béjart and Roy Lichtenstein as well as primatologist Jane Goodall.

 

 

About Kyocera

Headquartered in Kyoto, Japan, Kyocera Corporation is one of the world's leading manufacturers of fine ceramic components for the technology industry. The strategically important divisions in the Kyocera Group, which is comprised of 235 subsidiaries (as of March 31, 2016), are information and communications technologies, products which increase quality of life, and environmentally friendly products. The technology group is also one of the oldest producers of solar energy systems worldwide, with more than 40 years of experience in the industry.

The company is ranked #531 on Forbes magazine’s 2016 “Global 2000” listing of the world’s largest publicly traded companies.

With a global workforce of over 69,000 employees, Kyocera posted net sales of approximately €11.59 billion in fiscal year 2015/2016. The products marketed by the company in Europe include printers, digital copying systems, microelectronic components, and fine ceramic products. The Kyocera Group has two independent companies in the Federal Republic of Germany: Kyocera Fineceramics GmbH in Neuss and Esslingen and Kyocera Document Solutions in Meerbusch.

The company also takes an active interest in cultural affairs. The Kyoto Prize, a prominent international award, is presented each year by the Inamori Foundation — established by Kyocera founder Dr. Kazuo Inamori — to individuals and groups worldwide who have contributed significantly to the scientific, cultural, and spiritual betterment of humankind (converted at approximately €360,000 per prize category).

 



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